liquidating 529 - The economics of dating

Economics correspondent Paul Solman and Making Sen$e producer Lee Koromvokis spoke with labor economist Paul Oyer, author of the book “Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating.” Photo by Mike Blake/Reuters/Illustration Editor’s Note: With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, we decided to revisit a piece Making Sen$e did on the world of online dating. Making Sen$e airs every Thursday on the PBS News Hour.

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Well, from an economist’s perspective, I was ignoring what we call “statistical discrimination.” And so, people see that you’re separated, and they assume a lot more than just that.

I just thought, “I’m separated, I’m happy, I’m ready to look for a new relationship,” but a lot of people assume if you’re separated, you’re either not really — that you may go back to your former spouse — or that you’re an emotional wreck, that you’re just getting over the breakup of your marriage and so forth.

We offer you some services, which will make your trip and stay in Ukraine comfortable, safe and happy.

The list of services- transfer from the airport and back on the day of your departure. However, my family and friends would describe me as spunky, energetic, outgoing and very, very sweet.

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And so I started online dating, and immediately, as an economist, I saw this was a market like so many others.

The parallels between the dating market and the labor market are so overwhelming, I couldn’t help but notice that there was so much economics going on in the process.

But an inversely proportional supply and demand relationship only applies to markets that include the exchange of money, according to economist Marina Adshade, a professor at the Vancouver School of Economics and the author author of "Dollars and Sex." "If I buy something from you, all I have to do is give you currency, and then I can give that currency to a third party if I want. Barter economies are difficult because trying to find somebody who is selling what you want to buy and is buying what you have to sell is complicated," she said.

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