Radiometric dating sedimentary

These changes typically occur so slowly that they are barely detectable over the span of a human life, yet even at this instant, the Earth's surface is moving and changing.

As these changes have occurred, organisms have evolved, and remnants of some have been preserved as fossils.

Proponents of evolution publicize radioisotope dating as a reliable and consistent method for obtaining absolute ages of rocks and the age of the earth.

radiometric dating sedimentary-87

Xenotime has the properties of an ideal U–Pb chronometer, containing elevated levels of U (generally 1000 ppm) and very low concentrations of initial common Pb.

In addition, it has an exceptional ability to remain closed to element mobility during later thermal events, and commonly yields concordant and precise dates.

Despite seeming like a relatively stable place, the Earth's surface has changed dramatically over the past 4.6 billion years.

Mountains have been built and eroded, continents and oceans have moved great distances, and the Earth has fluctuated from being extremely cold and almost completely covered with ice to being very warm and ice-free.

Recent advances in the field of geochronology have led to a greater understanding of the scale and duration of geological processes.

It is currently possible to date igneous and metamorphic rocks by a variety of radiometric methods to within a million years, but establishing the depositional age of sedimentary rocks has remained exceedingly difficult.

Geochronologists do not claim that radiometric dating is foolproof (no scientific method is), but it does work reliably for most samples.

It is these highly consistent and reliable samples, rather than the tricky ones, that have to be falsified for "young Earth" theories to have any scientific plausibility, not to mention the need to falsify huge amounts of evidence from other techniques.

These are often characterised as the norm, rather than the exception.

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