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Any prophecy is subject to various interpretations since, as scripture says, we are 'looking through smoked glass' - God has not revealed all the details.However, He has given believers His Spirit to guide them to the truth on such issues (John 14.26).The Old Testament book of Daniel contains one of the most significant and intriguing prophecies of the Bible: "Seventy weeks have been decreed for your people and your holy city, to finish the transgression, to make an end of sin, to make an atonement for iniquity, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up vision and prophecy and to anoint the most holy place" (Dan 9.24) This prophecy first defines a timeline (70 'weeks') for some of the most significant events in history.

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Eschatology is an ancient branch of study in Christian theology, informed by Biblical texts such as the Olivet discourse, The Sheep and the Goats, and other discourses of end times by Jesus, with the doctrine of the Second Coming discussed by Paul of Tarsus The growing modern interest in eschatology is tied to developments in Anglophone Christianity.

Puritans in the 18th and 19th centuries were particularly interested in a postmillennial hope which surrounded Christian conversion.

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The contents of the book of Revelation also suggest a late date, as the following observations indicate.

The spiritual conditions of the churches described in Revelation chapters two and three more readily harmonize with the late date.

He places the book near the end of Domitian’s reign, and that ruler died in A. Victorinus (late third century), author of the earliest commentary on the book of Revelation, wrote: When John said these things, he was in the island of Patmos, condemned to the mines by Caesar Domitian.

There he saw the Apocalypse; and when at length grown old, he thought that he should receive his release by suffering; but Domitian being killed, he was liberated (.18).

This topic is widely debated with various interpretations of prophecy.

Here we take a common interpretation that is not in conflict with historical events, or with observed events (reality) in today's world.

Traditionally, the book of Revelation has been dated near the end of the first century, around A. James Orr has observed, however, that recent criticism has reverted to the traditional date of near A. In view of some of the bizarre theories that have surfaced in recent times (e.g., the notion that all end-time prophecies were fulfilled with the fall of Jerusalem in A. 70), which are dependent upon the preterist interpretation, we offer the following. 180), a student of Polycarp (who was a disciple of the apostle John), wrote that the apocalyptic vision “was seen not very long ago, almost in our own generation, at the close of the reign of Domitian” (Against Heresies 30). 155-215) says that John returned from the isle of Patmos “after the tyrant was dead” (.23).

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