Dating fender deluxe reverb reissue

The Deluxe Reverb is a 22-watt tube amplifier (at 8 ohms), powered by a pair ("duet") of 7408/6V6GT power tubes, one GZ34/5AR4 rectifier tube, four 7025/12AX7 tubes for preamplification and tremolo oscillation, and two 6201/12AT7 tubes driving the reverb and phase inverter circuits.

Throughout its production, the amplifier has most often featured a Jensen C-12Q series 12-inch loudspeaker, although Oxford 12K5, Marlboro SE, Utah and Eminence speakers have also been used.

The Fender '65 Deluxe Reverb Combo Amp has a sound big enough to cut through the muddiest mix, but it's small enough to turn up make the most of natural tube distortion in small clubs. It's a resurrection of a classic vintage tone monster, and its current iteration is used by many big-name bands, such as Flogging Molly, O. They also have hand-wired tube sockets and other parts for added strength.

dating fender deluxe reverb reissue-35

The entire line of Fender amplifiers from 1955 to 1959 (later for smaller models and Bassman) was uniform in this look—tweed or "airline linen" covering with a maroon with gold stripe woven saran grill cloth.

The 1×12 Deluxe-Amp, the 1×15 Pro-Amp and the 3×10 Bandmaster are exceptional in dynamics and tone.

The Fender Deluxe Reverb is a guitar amplifier made originally by Fender Electric Instruments which became Fender Musical Instruments in early 1965 when the company was purchased by CBS, and now by Fender.

It was first introduced in 1963 by incorporating an onboard spring reverb tank to the newly redesigned Fender Deluxe amplifier.

Tonal Characteristics: Bright, scooped midrange that is known as the "Blackface" sound, pronounced "Wine Glass" highs from the Jensen speakers and a slightly more polite power amp for crystal cleans that can also be cranked for great overdriven tones.

Who's it for: Players that love the original versions but are priced out of owning vintage amps, blues players, country players, rock players, guitarists trying to get classic "Blackface" sounds (a la Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix, John Mayer), American-made amp enthusiasts, traditionalists, avid Fender collectors.

After the preceding looks of the early 50's (TV front from 1950 to 51/2; wide panel '52–54), Leo Fender changed the cabinet design again, this time opting for no extra wood on the front of the amp, except for the narrow top and bottom panels that hold the baffle board to the cabinet.

The early models of the larger "narrow-panel" tweeds are also remarkable for their refined electronics whose circuit design incorporated dual 5U4 rectifiers in the Twin and Bassman models, another improvement given Fender's quest for a louder, cleaner amplifier.

When i switch from the Jaguar to the Gibson, i just turn Treble up from 5 to 6, and Bass down from 6 to 5.

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